Sunday, August 29, 2010

Suggested Sunday reading (8/29/10)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.

Thursday, Aug. 26, was Women's Equality Day, marking the day the 19th Amendment was certified, officially giving (some) women the right to vote. As with last week's roundup of 19th Amendment stories, there were a number of stories this week related to Women's Equality Day (and if you have written something, leave a link in the comments!):
  • Associated Press: "Gender gap in U.S. politics remains despite gains." Here's something to consider, from the article: " Worldwide, women hold 19 percent of the seats in national legislatures, according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union. Its rankings of 186 nations – based on percentage of women in the single or lower chamber of the legislature – has the U.S. tied for 90th with Turkmenistan."
  • Womanist Musings: "Not All Women Won The Right to Vote Today."
  • Presidential Proclamation: "Women's Equality Day, 2010"
  • Truthout: "Aniston-O'Reilly Tiff Mirrors Gender Disparities on Women's Equality Day."
  • Hello Ladies: "Six Ways to Honor Women’s Equality Day." This is a great list, and I'd like to say thanks to the author for including me!
  • Miami Herald: "90 years after women's suffrage, equality issues unresolved."
  • TBD: "Suffragettes return, rally for D.C. voting rights." It boggles my mind.
  • Daily Camera: "Unused freedom to vote."

In other news:
  • ESPN: "Hall of Fame honors Chelsea Baker." I love this story. The Hall in question is the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, and Chelsea is a 13-year-old Little League player who has pitched two perfect games -- against boys.
  • New York Times: "How Power Has Transformed Women’s Tennis." Also check out Antonia Zerbisias' article, "Grand Slam," on Broadsides.
  • USA Today: "Wal-Mart wants women's pay class-action suit thrown out." No way!
  • Bitch: "Mad World: The Huffington Post's Sexist Linkbait Strategy." Love this, because it's so, so true.
  • Ms. blog: "Newsflash: Colorado Prisons’ 'Labia Lift' Policy." If you're thinking "what??" you are not alone. I had no idea either.
  • The Frisky: "In Defense Of 'Angry' Feminists."
  • Daily Kos: "Want a raise? Wash your vagina."
  • Fair and Feminist: Check out the posts for the "This is What a Young Feminist Looks Like" blog carnival.
  • The Angry Black Woman: "The Dark Side of Being Pretty."
  • The Guardian: "Disabled people do have sex lives. Get over it."
  • Ms. blog: "Who’s Afraid of the Single Black Woman?"
  • Huffington Post: "Is (Black) Beauty Still a Feminist Issue?"
  • CNN: "Muslim women who wear the hijab and niqab explain their choice"
  • Racialicious: "Another day, another apology – this time to Inuit for high arctic relocation."
  • Afghan Women's Writing Project: "A Bold Step For Afghan Women Journalists." Three journalists are creating Afghanistan’s first Women’s Journalism Center. Love that!
  • MSNBC: "Some 200 women gang-raped near Congo UN base."
  • RH Reality Check: "Haitian Women Fight Sexual Violence."
  • Medill Reports: "HIV/AIDS prevention gel gets standing ovation."

LGBTQ:
  • The New Republic: "Disgrace: Obama’s increasingly absurd gay marriage position."
  • New York Times: "At West Point, Hidden Gay Cadets Put in Spotlight"
  • The Atlantic: "Bush Campaign Chief and Former RNC Chair Ken Mehlman: I'm Gay." This article at first infuriated me, but ultimately it's just sad.
  • Philadelphia Inquirer: "Transgender rules on driver's licenses changed."
  • Memphis news station: "Former Memphis Officer Pleads Guilty in Transgender Beating Case."
  • Bay Windows: "Transgender woman pleased with hospital’s response."
  • The Atlantic: "Transgender Candidate Receives 22% in GOP House Primary." While I don't hold the same political views (at all) as Donna Milo, this is still important.
  • The Advocate: "Bogotá Warms to Gay Marriage."

Pop culture:
  • Ms. blog: "True Blood Cast Gets Sexy And Bloody–Remind You of Anything?"
  • Vanity Fair: "Vampire Weekend’s Mutinous Muse: Ann Kirsten Kennis says her face appeared on the cover of a No. 1 album without her knowledge or consent. Does she deserve compensation?"
  • Pop Candy: "Raggedy Ann prepares to turn 95 years young." Included because as a child, I loved Raggedy Ann and Andy. And I so want the commemorative dolls!
  • Spinoff: "Marvel Reacts To 'Runaways' Race Bending Accusations."
  • Entertainment Weekly: "Original Blue Power Ranger reveals that he was harassed on set for being gay."
  • USA Today: "Heart gets thumping again with new album, tranquil attitude." Consider this: Ann Wilson is 60 years old, and Nancy is 56. Bad ass.
  • Jezebel: "In Defense Of Lady-Terrorizing Horror Movies." I love horror movies, even though they're so often problematic.
  • Huffington Post: "Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Weiner Speak Out On Franzen Feud."

Friday, August 27, 2010

In History: Rayna Diane Green

This is the 40th post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.


Rayna Diane Green was born in 1942 and is of the Cherokee tribe of Oklahoma. She is the first American Indian to earn a Ph.D. in the field of folklore and American studies, from Indiana University. She has written numerous books (including a book in 1984 called "That's What She Said: Contemporary Poetry and Fiction by Native American Women," so suck it Michael Scott), articles, papers; given many lectures; and taught at a number of universities. She is currently the Curator and Director of the American Indian Program at the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution. According to her staff page, her research specialties include "American identity, the politics of culture in contemporary American Indian art and music, American and American Indian material culture, American Indian women, American Indian agriculture and foodways, contemporary American foodways and wine." (How fascinating does that all sound?) At that link, you can also see a list of her present and past projects, and a list of some of her publications. You can also read more about her here.

Photo source

Sunday, August 22, 2010

Suggested Sunday reading (8/22/10)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.

On Aug. 18, the 19th Amendment -- the one giving women the right to vote in the United States -- turned 90 years old. The battle to get women the right to vote was a long one, and not without its own problems. There are some great articles on the topic:
  • Salon: "The 19th amendment turns 90 despite the haters."
  • Washington Post: "19th amendment anniversary: Politicians celebrate." (Good roundup of links.)
  • Colorlines: "The 90th Anniversary of a Women’s Right to Vote."
  • Bitch magazine: "Push(back) at the Intersections: How About Some -isms with Your Feminism?"
  • Providence Journal: "19th amendment timeline from 1848 to 1920."
  • Fordham: "Modern History Sourcebook: The Passage of the 19th Amendment, 1919-1920, Articles from The New York Times."
In other news:
  • Work in Progress: "US Chamber: Equal Pay 'a Fetish for Money,' Women Should 'Choose the Right Partner at Home.'" This is outrageous. The chamber in question is the US Chamber of Commerce, and you can read the original post here; note the update at the bottom, trying to apologize if people misinterpreted what the author meant. Also, the COO of the chamber responded, and disagrees with the original article. But don't miss the update at the end of Work in Progress' post either, because it's important.
  • OCD Chick: "Rob Dibble Rant and Response Roundup," about the baseball announcer's comments on some women who dared to talk during a baseball game.
  • Bloomberg: "How Teen Sex Affects Education: In romantic relationships it's academically harmless but less so in casual pairings, study finds." Hmmm.
  • Salt Lake Tribune: "Mormon feminism: It’s back." Also check out this article, "Mormon women’s quarterly starts up the presses — again."
  • Politics Daily: "'Eat, Pray, Love' Author to Lobby Congress for Bi-National Gay-Spouse Rights."
  • ABC News: "Top Ranked Lesbian Cadet Leaves West Point." Because of DADT. How many good people does our military have to lose before it's repealed?
  • Christian Science Monitor: "Mexico court upholds gay adoption law. Is Mexico more tolerant than US?"
  • CNN: "Shifting attitudes take gay rights fight across globe, experts say."
  • Religion Dispatches: "In the Trenches with the HRC, Working for Transgender Inclusion."
  • Stroller Derby: "Should Bars Refuse to Serve Pregnant Women?"
  • Museum of Modern Art: "Riot on the Page: Thirty Years of Zines by Women." So awesome!
  • Care2: "Men Wear Bras And Women Bare Their Breasts On 'Topless Day.'"
  • Huffington Post: "Women Take On Gender Apartheid in the Catholic Church."
  • Irish Times: "Let the struggle for women's equality in the church continue and intensify." This is part of a series; the links to the rest are on the page.
  • CNN: "What drives a mom to kill?" I thought this article was pretty decent, giving actual explanations for what some women experience, and not pointing too many "how could you?!" fingers.
  • Washington Times: "Poll: Women today treated with less chivalry." This whole article made me groan. Then again, consider its source.
  • Womanist Musings: "90 Year Old Grandmother Raped In Detroit." This is a must-read, IMO.
  • The Crunk Feminist Collective: "Antoine Dodson’s Sister: On Invisibility as Violence." Also must-read.
  • Advocate: "Target's 'Bigot Special.'" If you haven't seen this video yet, go watch it.
  • On Top magazine: "Shareholders Demand Changes As Target Boycott Rolls On."
Pop culture:
  • Womanist Musings: "Seth MacFarlane Really Needs A Mute Button."
  • After Ellen: "Read TV's biggest salaries and weep." Discussing men's and women's salaries for being on TV shows.
  • New York Times: "Sunrise at Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce: A ‘Mad Men’ Photo Sequence." Included because it cracks me up.
  • Slate: "The Conservatism of 'The Switch.'"
  • Associated Press: "Newcomer lands starring role in U.S. remake of 'Dragon Tattoo.'" Her name is Rooney Mara.

Photo: Alice Paul, leader of the National Woman’s Party, unfurled the completed Ratification Flag in Washington D.C. in August 1920 to celebrate passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guaranteeing women nationally the right to vote. (Credit: Library of Congress/”Winning the Vote”)

Friday, August 20, 2010

In History: Mary Vaux Walcott

This is the 39th post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.


Mary Vaux Walcott was born in Philadelphia in 1860, and is perhaps best known for two things: one, her watercolor paintings of wildflowers, and two, being married to Charles Doolittle Walcott, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. The latter is mostly important because Mary often traveled with him on his projects, working on her art while with him, and because the Smithsonian published a five-volume book of her paintings in 1925, titled "North American Wild Flowers." The work included 400 colored lithographic prints. The Smithsonian also published her "Illustrations of American Pitcherplants" in 1935, with 15 illustrations.

Walcott served on the federal Board of Indian Commissioners, from 1927 to 1932. In 1933, she was elected president of the Society of Woman Geographers. A mountain in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada, is named Mount Mary Vaux after her. (How cool is that?!)

Butterfly Pea (Clitoria mariana), 1934, Mary Vaux Walcott

You can see many of Walcott's watercolors here.

Photos courtesy of the Smithsonian Institute (top, bottom).

Sunday, August 15, 2010

Suggested Sunday reading (8/15/10)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.

The comic strip "Cathy," which started in 1976, is ending in October. There's a lot of love and hate for this comic. I remember reading it as a kid and enjoying it, but I haven't paid much attention to it since then. I like Broadsheet's article, "Goodbye, Cathy, feminist trailblazer." Also check out Jezebel's "How Cathy Predicted The Downfall Of Human Civilization." And Care2.org has a roundup of what some people have to say about Cathy.

In other news:

  • Washington Post: "FDA approves ella as 5-day-after emergency contraceptive." This is really good news.
  • Think Progress: "Anti-Choice Group Says Its 'Prayers' Have Been Answered When Abortion Clinic Closes Due To Doctor’s Leukemia." Oh the hypocrisy. It hurts.
  • Change.org: "Trafficked, Abused Maids in Kuwait Seek Legal Protection."
  • Los Angeles Times: "Some girls' puberty age still falling, study suggests."
  • Hello Ladies: "Have You Heard Women Make Bad Bosses?"
  • Ms. blog: "Oh SNAP! Reduced Food Stamps Are a Feminist Issue."
  • Associated Press: "First woman to head major US intelligence agency." Congrats to her!
  • The Consumerist: "Craiglist CEO Responds To Allegations The Site Is A Hub For Child Prostitution." Also check out this article on that site: "Xbox Assumes Women Contacting Them Must Be Doing It For Their 'Sons.'"
  • Broadsheet: "The great (gay) surname debate."
  • AFP: "Abortion ban leading to crisis in Philippines — rights group."
  • SAFER Blog: "Beyond the Campus: Weeks 18 & 19."
  • Colorlines: "Single Women Fend for Themselves in Recession."
  • Ms. blog: "Happy 150th Birthday, Annie Oakley!"
  • Ms. blog: "For Latinas, A Fine Line Between Reproductive Justice and Eugenics." Read this.
  • WCF Courier: "Wisconsin Diocese offers birth control insurance, but warns employees not to use it." As in they'll get fired if they do.
  • ABC: "Botox: New Trend for Teenage Girls." Umm, what??
  • Broadsheet: "Putting the 'men' in menstruation: A Japanese machine introduces males to the pain and inconvenience of periods."
  • Los Angeles Times: "French look askance at topless beachgoers." In other words, they don't want to see "old" breasts.
  • Women's Eye on Media: "Ke$ha Appropriates Native Culture Again." Just stop, please.

Friday, August 13, 2010

In History: Yoshioka Yayoi

This is the 38th post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.


Yoshioka Yayoi was born in 1871 in Japan. She grew up to become a doctor, graduating from the Saisei-Gakusha school of medicine, and received the 27th medical license granted to a woman in Japan. Yoshioka started and opened the Tokyo Women's Medical School at a time when the Japanese government didn't even allow women to enroll in the national medical examination. She was active in the women's movement in Japan and advocated for sex education. During World War II, Yoshioka was a leading figure in patriotic women's associations, and after the she was involved in organizations promoting the education of women. She received a number of awards, including many after her death in 1959. A memorial museum dedicated to her exists in Kakegawa, Shizuoka.

Sunday, August 8, 2010

Suggested Sunday reading (8/8/10)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.

This week, I've been really interested in the conversations taking place about the Eminem song "Love the Way You Lie," featuring Rihanna, and the video for the song, which came out this week. If you haven't seen the video, you can check it out on YouTube, or it's embedded in this article on The Stir, "'Love the Way You Lie' Video: Domestic Violence Has Never Looked Like This." (Content warning for depictions of domestic abuse.) I've come across some good back-and-forth discussions on Tumblr, some of which I've reposted and added to, if you want to check them out. Personally, I think both the song and the video are actually really great and thought-provoking, though I can see the other side of the discussion (that it glorifies domestic violence, that it sounds like you should empathize with the abuser, or that you have to consider the source). You can read more about the video at Bitch and Feministing. Also, Megan Fox, who stars in the video with Dominic Monaghan, did something really great: she donated her appearance fee to the Sojorn House, a shelter for abused women. Good on her.

In other reading:
  • New York Times: "Indonesia Finds Banning Pornography Is Difficult." As in banning all porn on the entire Internet.
  • Wall Street Journal: "Islamic Feminists Storm Some Barricades: Can pray-ins by Muslim women end segregation at U.S. mosques?"
  • BBC: "Blog reveals Afghanistan medic Karen Woo's dedication." Woo was one of the medics recently killed in Afghanistan.
  • Boston Globe: "Women on Supreme Court no longer 'curiosities.'" Elena Kagan was sworn in this week, as the fourth woman to ever serve on the court.
  • Shakesville: "Today in Rape Culture." This post is about a doctor who has been charged with sexually assaulted a number of patients -- and won't lose his medical license.
  • Womanist Musings: "Keep Your Cum To Yourself." High "ick" factor here.
  • Change.org: "Bangladesh Outlaws Fatwas That Call For Flogging Of Rape Victims."
  • The Daily Beast: "A New Fight Over Abortion Access." About crisis pregnancy centers.
  • Gender Across Borders: "Abortion and domination in France and Brazil." Also at GAB: "Brava, Kristof: A Column All About Abortion and Misoprostol."
  • The Hill: "Senate Republicans push bill to limit abortion coverage."
  • GOP Choice: "Guest Blog from Amanda Mountjoy, RMC’s Colorado Chapter Chair," on the personhood amendment on the ballot in Colorado.
  • Pride in Utah: "Transgender Woman Refused Hospital Treatment."
  • Children's Hospital Boston: "Children’s gives transgender tween new hope."
  • Genderbitch: "Feminist Disavowal Of Cissexism."
  • The Wonk Room: "In Historic Move, HHS Encourages LGBT-Inclusive Sexual Education."
  • Colorlines: "BP's Dumping Oil-Spill Waste in Communities of Color, Study Finds."
  • Jezebel: "A Woman's Vagina — In Public — Faces Tough Expectations." I can't get over the prevent-camel-toe-inserts. Cannot even begin to believe those exist.
  • Jessica Valenti: "Slut-shaming and misogyny as traffic bait."
  • Little Merry Sunshine: "What This Woman Really Wants Is Not A Vacuum Cleaner."
  • Deeply Problematic: "Women and bodily functions: poop."
  • Feministing: "The Gap wants you to cover up your ugly legs." No really, they do.
  • Jezebel: "When It Comes To Women's Issues, Facebook Still Hasn't Figured Out How To Play Fair." And that would seemingly apply to this Facebook event page.
  • Women and Hollywood: "If Women Like It, It Must Be Stupid." Excellent post.
  • Jezebel: "Ann Taylor: 'We Agree Our Retouching Has Been Overzealous.'"
  • Feministing: "Don't Mess with Tami!" about the abortion storyline on "Friday Night Lights."

Friday, August 6, 2010

In History: Ethel Waters

This is the 37th post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.


Ethel Waters was a jazz and blues vocalist and an actress. She became the fifth black woman to make a record, in 1921. In 1949, she was nominated for an Oscar for best supporting actress in the film "Pinky." She was the second black person to be nominated for an Oscar (the first: Hattie McDaniel, who won for her supporting performance in Gone with the Wind). She is referred to as the first black superstar. She had a life; read more about her here, here and here, and you can learn about efforts to get her a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame here.

Image source

Sunday, August 1, 2010

Suggested Sunday reading (8/1/10)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.

This was one of my favorite articles from this week: "Chelsea Clinton's big fat leaked wedding," on Broadsheet. You know, a lot is said about weddings and feminism. Like, a lot. Some people think the two can't really co-exist; others see no problem with it and embrace both at the same time. I myself (a feminist) have no real problem with weddings in and of themselves (except that not everyone can get married, I have a huge problem with that). I've never had a wedding, but I have been in wedding parties and attended more than I care to count, and some were really great! Weddings, to me, are for each couple to decide. I might not agree with some particulars, but if it's what the couple wants, who am I to say that's wrong? However, I do think the wedding industry is way out of hand, and I do think the pressure to have everything perfect is too intense. And I completely agree with this in the article: "Weddings are joyful and great. What they are not is the apotheosis of the human, the romantic or, more pointedly, the female experience."

In other news:
  • Change.org: "Belated Justice for Victims of NJ's Hair-Braiding Slavery Ring." Yes, slavery. Today. In the United States. This is happening. Read more about human trafficking in the U.S. at In These Times.
  • Ms. blog: "Forever 21′s Maternity Line: What About Corporate Responsibility?"
  • Alternet: "Right-Wingers Freak Out Over Montana Sex Ed Curriculum."
  • Alternet: "5 Stupid, Unfair and Sexist Things Expected of Men." Patriarchy hurts everyone.
  • Life magazine: "The Photo That Brought AIDS Home." Must-read, must-see.
  • Colorlines: "HIV in Poor U.S. Neighborhoods as Intense as Developing World."
  • Native American Times: "Boxer sets her sights on Olympics," about Mioshia Wagoner. Women's boxing will be an Olympic sport for the first time in 2012.
  • Hello Ladies: "Dear Mr. President," a letter to Obama after his appearance on The View.
  • Feministe: "ain’t i a mama?" If you haven't read this yet, be sure to get deep in the comments.
  • Racism Review: "Civil Rights Review: Do you know these courageous women?"
  • The Sexist posts a "Goodbye" column, which is not good news.
  • Yes Means Yes: "My Sluthood, Myself." Good read.
  • Change.org: "Clear Channel Gives Green Light for Homophobia Over Its Airwaves."
Abortion:
  • The Star-Ledger: "Gov. Christie vetoes bill restoring $7.5M grant for family planning." This is in New Jersey, and affects Planned Parenthood.
  • The Post and Courier: "Group protests Graham." That group would be Operation Rescue, and Graham is Sen. Lindsey Graham. The protest? It was a "Beating, Burning and Hanging Lindsey 'Benedict Arnold' Graham in Effigy" protest. Pro-life! Totally!
  • RH Reality Check: "Why is Washington State Flip-Flopping on Pharmacy Refusal?"
  • The Daddy Files: "Thanks Dad," a follow-up piece on the guy who recorded protesters outside a clinic when his wife had to have an abortion.
  • Feministe: "being a mother isnt always a choice, not yet."
Rape / Sexual Assault:
  • Bitch magazine: "Genderlicious: Call for Submissions to 'Dear Sister.'" Check this out; deadline to submit is Nov. 1.
  • Gawker: "StickyDrama's Owner Recorded a Live-Streamed Rape and Blogged About It—But Didn't Report It."
  • Examiner: "Court rejects religious rape defense on appeal."
  • This Ain't Livin': "Nice Guys and Behavioural Conditioning." Dealing with rape culture here.
  • Telegraph: "Palestinian jailed for rape after claiming to be Jewish."
  • Tiger Beatdown: "All Your Boobs Belong To Us: Some Thoughts About Consent While Female."
  • abyss2hope: "New Study Challenges Stereotypes of Adolescent Sex Offenders."
  • The Curvature: "President Obama to Sign Law Targeting Sexual Violence Against Native American Women."
  • Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Suit charges Upper St. Clair officials made rape victim 'bait.'" We're talking about a teenager here. In school.
International news:
  • Irish Times: "Sterile future for women with HIV." About women in South Africa and Namibia being coerced into sterilization.
  • IPS News: "Millennium Goal on Maternal Health in Sight." This is in Uruguay.
  • Ms. blog: "Newsflash: Mexican Women Convicted of Homicide for Abortion."
  • Daily Mail: "Striking female workers paid just £1 a day at factory which makes clothes for Gap and Adidas are beaten by riot police." This is in Cambodia.
  • Tapped: "The Little Picture: Workers' Victory in Bangladesh." Garment workers have won a raise, from $25 a month to $45 a month.
  • Time magazine: "The Plight of Afghan Women: A Disturbing Picture."
  • Huffington Post: "Teenage Girls Undergo 'Breast Ironing' In Cameroon." Because having breasts leads to pregnancy and/or sexual assault.
Pop culture:
  • Eye Weekly: "Can I have a word with you?" Secondary headline says "According to the objectionable South African electro-rap crew Die Antwoord, 'no means yes' — and their young female fans, sadly, are all too eager to sing along."
  • Hollywood Reporter: "CBS adding three gay characters to shows." How does this work? Does the network make these shows add a character?
  • The Fbomb: "Huge and Feminist Stereotypes." I agree more with the commenters (like Heather) than the original post.
  • NPR: "Sugar Pie DeSanto: After 50 Years, 'Go Going' Strong."

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