Sunday, February 27, 2011

Suggested Sunday reading (2/27/11)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.

Walk for Choice at the capitol building in Austin, TX. Source.
I'm sorry to say that I haven't been able to keep up with all the anti-women legislation sweeping across the U.S. these days, at both the federal and state levels. I'm hoping to do better with that. It's just that there's so.fucking.much of it that it's all starting to blur together. I'll have some listed below, but if you, too, feel behind on all this hate, check out Hello Ladies' post, "The Hypocrisy of the 'Pro-Life' Movement." It's hard to wrap my head around all this; it's so awful I can only think "this cannot be real." I have much gratitude for the thousands of people who took part in the Walk for Choice yesterday. I wasn't able to, but I followed along as best I could via Twitter and Tumblr, and it sounds like a successful event, so yay for that!
  • Daily Kos: "GA Legislator Wants to Create The Uterus Police to Investigate Miscarriages." No, really. This is true. If you can stomach it, read the proposed legislation for yourself. And read "Are you there, Representative Bobby Franklin? It’s Me, Devery," on Tiger Beatdown.
  • Slate: "Arizona Approves Bill To Ban Race- and Sex-Selective Abortions."
  • Richmond Times-Dispatch: "After vote, Virginia's abortion clinics face new regulation." Alternate headline: "A bunch of white men pass bill that will close 17 of 21 abortion clinics in Virginia."
  • Talking Points Memo: "It's Not Just SD: Slew Of New State Laws Put Pro-Choicers On Notice." Care2 has a related petition you can sign.
In other news:
  • Boing Boing: "Alaska state rep refuses TSA grope of her mastectomy scars, drives home from Seattle."
  • National Black Justice Coalition: "Black History Month Profiles: Highlighting Black Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender People."
  • Box Turtle: "Tennessee Lawmakers Propose Ban on Mentioning LGBT People in Schools."
  • What Men Dare Do: "Men Calling Themselves 'Feminist'."
  • NPR: "Virus Passed During Oral Sex Tops Tobacco As Throat Cancer Cause." This is something people need to know, I'd say.
  • Huffington Post: "Lady Porn Day: Chicago Sex Journalist Wants Women To Speak Up About Porn."
  • WUSA9.com: "High Price Of Being A Woman." Another story about how women pay more for the same products and services compared to what men pay. I will always post these stories when I come across them.
  • Mother Jones: "It's the Inequality, Stupid: Eleven charts that explain everything that's wrong with America." Because class is a feminist issue, too.
  • New York Times: "Anti-Abortion Billboard is Removed."
  • Women's Views on News: "Rapist goes free in Canadian court when judge decides she asked for it."
  • Pandagon: "All women are 'fat.'" Great points made here.
  • CNN: "Revolution signals new dawn for Egypt's women."
  • OMG!: "Beyonce Under Fire for Blackface Photos."

Friday, February 25, 2011

In History: Gottlieb Jazz Photos

This is the 66th post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.

The Library of Congress has a stunning set of photos on its Flickr site, the Gottlieb Jazz Photos. From their description:
Celebrated jazz artists come to life in photographs by William P. Gottlieb. His images document the jazz scene in New York City and Washington, D.C., from 1938 to 1948, a time recognized by many as the "Golden Age of Jazz".

Gottlieb was both a notable jazz journalist and a self-taught photographer who captured the personalities of jazz musicians and told their stories with his camera and typewriter. His portraits depict such prominent musicians and personalities as Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Thelonious Monk, Ella Fitzgerald, and many more.
I haven't had the chance to look through all the photos, but here are a couple of my favorites so far:


Portrait of Mildred Bailey, Carnegie Hall(?), New York, N.Y., ca. Apr. 1947



Portrait of Ella Fitzgerald, New York, N.Y., ca. Nov. 1946


Portrait of Billie Holiday, Downbeat, New York, N.Y., ca. Feb. 1947


Really, just gorgeous photos of some extremely influential and talented women. And there are so many more photos! Check them out sometime.

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Suggested Sunday reading (2/20/11)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.

To be honest, the news this week has left me exhausted. I wish I had the energy to write up commentary about it, but at the moment I don't. So all I can really say is, please, do what you can to make your voices heard about the U.S. House's vote to defund Planned Parenthood, and if you can, attend a Walk for Choice event on Saturday, Feb. 26. And please sign this petition, I Stand With Planned Parenthood. Also, Fair and Feminist is hosting an "I Stand with Planned Parenthood" blog carnival on Feb. 25, if you want to participate in it. I will be.
  • NPR: "New Contraception Rules Spark 'Conscience Clause' Debate."
  • The Texas Tribune: "Abortion Sonogram Passes in Texas Senate."
  • Dayton Daily News: "Abortion foes to announce 'Heartbeat Bill.'" This is in Ohio. Where I live.
  • Think Progress: "Revealing Her Own Abortion, Rep. Speier Criticizes Conservatives For Failing To Empathize With Women." Do watch this video if you haven't yet.
  • The Washington Post: "Abortion rights are under attack, and pro-choice advocates are caught in a time warp."
  • Mother Jones: "South Dakota Moves To Legalize Killing Abortion Providers." I believe this bill has been tabled, but even so everyone should know it was actually introduced and considered.
  • Uruknet: "Afghan Government Cracks Down on Women’s Shelters."
  • Associated Press: "Japanese women fight to keep surnames in marriage."
  • Gender Across Borders: "Children Raising Children, The Cycle of Reproductive Rights in Argentina."
  • Salon: "What not to say about Lara Logan."
  • The Guardian: "Adding insult to Lara Logan's injury."
  • Ms. blog: "Republicans’ War on Women."
  • Slate: "Iowa Wrestler Won't Wrestle a Girl Because His Parents Are Raising Him to Be Self-Important." (How great is this headline?!)
Popular culture:
  • The New York Times: "Cindy Sherman’s Guises All in a Single Place."
  • Hollywood Reporter: "Adrianne Palicki to Play Wonder Woman in NBC Pilot." I'm really curious about this show. Fingers crossed.
  • New York Observer: "'SNL' Ladies Follow Fey's Lead to Bookstores." I will need to read all these.
  • Out magazine: "50 Essential Gay Films."

Friday, February 18, 2011

10 Shocking Attacks in the GOP War on Women

This blog post was originally posted on American Razor, and is being cross-posted with permission:

Saw this over at the Corrupt Politics blog, who got it from MoveOn.org, and since we all know any mention of MoveOn will automatically be dismissed by right-wingers, I added my own links to cite each item.

1) Republicans not only want to reduce women’s access to abortion care, they’re actually trying to redefine rape. After a major backlash, they promised to stop. But they haven’t.

2) A state legislator in Georgia wants to change the legal term for victims of rape, stalking, and domestic violence to “accuser.” But victims of other less gendered crimes, like burglary, would remain “victims.”

3) In South Dakota, Republicans proposed a bill that could make it legal to murder a doctor who provides abortion care. (Yep, for real.)

4) Republicans want to cut nearly a billion dollars of food and other aid to low-income pregnant women, mothers, babies, and kids.

5) In Congress, Republicans have proposed a bill that would let hospitals allow a woman to die rather than perform an abortion necessary to save her life.

6) Maryland Republicans ended all county money for a low-income kids’ preschool program. Why? No need, they said. Women should really be home with the kids, not out working.

7) And at the federal level, Republicans want to cut that same program, Head Start, by $1 billion. That means over 200,000 kids could lose their spots in preschool.

8) Two-thirds of the elderly poor are women, and Republicans are taking aim at them too. A spending bill would cut funding for employment services, meals, and housing for senior citizens.

9) Congress will vote any day now on a Republican amendment to cut all federal funding from Planned Parenthood health centers, one of the most trusted providers of basic health care and family planning in our country. (Note: The House passed this bill on Friday afternoon.)

10) And if that wasn’t enough, Republicans are pushing to eliminate all funds for the only federal family planning program. (For humans. But Republican Dan Burton has a bill to provide contraception for wild horses. You can’t make this stuff up).

How can anyone defend these politicians? The Republican Party has done a lot of really awful things in the last few decades, but have they ever just outright governed out of spite like this? These measures are pure cruelty.

In History: Audre Lorde and Toni Morrison

This is the 65th post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.




As it so happens, two literary giants were born on this day: Toni Morrison (top photo), who turns 80, and Audre Lorde, who was died in 1992 at age 58. Both of these women have made a huge impact on many, many people. Do yourself a favor and read their works, and read up on their lives.

Happy birthday to them!!

Sunday, February 13, 2011

Suggested Sunday reading (2/13/11)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.
  • AlterNet: "GOP War on Rape Victims? Georgia Republican Introduces Bill That Would Call Rape Victims 'Accusers.'"
  • The Guardian: "Africa shows signs of winning war against female genital mutilation."
  • New York Times: "The Siege of Planned Parenthood," an op-ed by Gail Collins.
  • Religious Action Center: "Family Planning De-Funding Threatens Vital Reproductive Health Services."
  • Hello Ladies: "On Baseball and Postpartum Depression."
  • The Jewish Daily Forward: "Gay and Orthodox: And Cleaving Strongly to Both."
  • KFOR.com: "Ohio lawmaker seeks to ban abortions once sound of first heartbeat is detected."
  • R&D magazine: "Choices, not discrimination, deter women scientists." This kind of sounds like a load of crap to me.
  • KHON2.com: "Hawaii House passes same-sex civil unions bill."
  • Change.org: "Pardon Kelley Williams-Bolar -- she shouldn't go to jail for protecting her kids."
  • CNN: "Pepsi to release new 'skinny can,'" just in time for Fashion Week. Ugh.

Friday, February 11, 2011

In History: Willie Barrow

This is the 64th post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.

Willie Barrow was born on Dec. 7, 1924. Often called "the Little Warrior," Barrow is best known for her civil rights activism, active role in the Church of God, Operation PUSH leadership, and being campaign manager for presidential campaign of Jesse Jackson.

Barrow was raised in rural Texas on a farm with her six siblings. As a student in Texas in the 1940s, she led a demonstration of rural African American schoolchildren against a segregated school system that refused them bus service because of their race. She was called to ministry when she was sixteen. While studying ministry in Portland, Ore., she organized the first African American Church of God. She was also a welder in a shipyard, where she met Clyde Barrow, whom she married, and where she became involved in the labor movement.

From Portland, Clyde and Willie Barrow moved to Chicago in 1943, where she studied at the Moody Bible Institute and the Central Conservatory of Music, in addition to her work with the Church of God. In the 1950s she became active in the civil rights movement, working with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as a field organizer for marches and demonstrations.

Barrow helped found Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, which grew into Operation PUSH (People United to Save Humanity, later People United to Serve Humanity). Barrow was a key "lieutenant" of Jesse Jackson in his much of his Chicago-based activism, working on many projects and in many organizations together, including the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and a long association with Operation PUSH. When Jackson ran for president for the 1984 election, she served as his campaign manager.

She was the first woman to serve as a national vice president of Operation PUSH, and in 1986, became the president of Operation PUSH, retiring in 1989. She served as a co-chairperson of the Rainbow/PUSH Coalition (RPC), and in 2009 was the RPC chairperson, emeritus.

Barrow was also active in working against US involvement in the Vietnam War. In 1968, Barrow and two others led a delegation to North Vietnam. As well, she was active in the National Urban League and the NCNW. She's also been involved in women's issues and in gay and lesbian issues.

You can read more about Barrow here and here.

Sunday, February 6, 2011

Suggested Sunday reading (2/6/11)

Just a quick reminder, you can submit links for this column via e-mail at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com, and you can catch up with Spare Candy on Twitter, Facebook or Tumblr as well. Or! Leave a link in the comments! Self-promotion is perfectly acceptable here.
  • Reuters: "Super Bowl a magnet for under-age sex trade."
  • MSNBC: "New breastfeeding law could help mothers nursing at work."
  • Think Progress: "Rep. Wasserman Schultz: Bill Redefining Rape To Prevent Abortions Is 'A Violent Act Against Women.'" However, read the following ...
  • Huffington Post: "House Republicans Drop 'Forcible Rape' Language From Abortion Bill." And again, read the following ...
  • Feministe: "New bill will let doctors refuse to save the lives of pregnant women."
  • Men's Health: "The F Word: An Introduction." So, Men's Health has a feminist blogger. Very interested to see where this goes.
  • The Baltimore Sun: "Judge rules pregnancy center ordinance unconstitutional." Sigh.
  • NPR: "Longest-Serving Woman Senator Looks After The Rest." This is about Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who has been in the Senate since 1986.
  • Wall Street Journal: "Toshiba Accused of Gender Discrimination in U.S."
  • Feministing: "The Struggle for Transgender and Genderqueer Legitimacy."
  • Feministing: "Illinois becomes 6th state to allow civil unions for same-sex couples."
  • And speaking of Feministing, Jessica Valenti (founder of the site), has stepped down. You can read her post about it here.
  • New York Times: "Officials Consider Requiring Insurers to Offer Free Contraceptives."
  • The Advocate: "Iowa House Votes For Marriage Ban." On this topic, be sure to check out this video, if you haven't seen it yet: from AOL News, "Zach Wahls' Iowa Speech for Gay Marriage Goes Viral."
  • AlterNet: "9 New Laws in the GOP's War Against Women."
  • New York Magazine: "They Know What Boys Want." This is part of a series about porn, and this story talks to girls in junior high school and what they hear from boys their age. I found it quite sad.
  • The Guardian: "Research shows male writers still dominate books world." Not on my bookshelves they don't!
  • Feministe: "Standing with Planned Parenthood."

Friday, February 4, 2011

In History: Rosa Parks, Betty Friedan, and Isabel Martínez de Perón

This is the 63rd post in a weekly feature here at Spare Candy, called "In History." Some posts might be little more than a photo, others full on features. If you have any suggestions for a person or event that should be featured, or would like to submit a guest post or cross post, e-mail me at rosiered23 (at) sparecandy (dot) com.

Happy birthday to Rosa Parks, Betty Friedan, and Isabel Martínez de Perón, all of whom were born on this day, Feb. 4.

Rosa Parks (born 1913; pictured)
Parks was an African American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress later called "the first lady of civil rights", and "the mother of the freedom movement."

On Dec. 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Ala., Parks, age 42, refused to obey bus driver James Blake's order that she give up her seat to make room for a white passenger. Her action was not the first of its kind. Irene Morgan in 1946, and Sarah Louise Keys in 1955, had won rulings before the U.S. Supreme Court, and the Interstate Commerce Commission, respectively, in the area of interstate bus travel. Nine months before Parks refused to give up her seat, 15-year-old Claudette Colvin refused to move from her seat on the same bus system. In New York City, in 1854, Lizzie Jennings engaged in similar activity, leading to the desegregation of the horsecars and horse-drawn omnibuses of that city. But unlike these previous individual actions of civil disobedience, Parks' action sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Parks' act of defiance became an important symbol of the modern Civil Rights Movement and Parks became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation. She organized and collaborated with civil rights leaders, including boycott leader Martin Luther King, Jr., helping to launch him to national prominence in the civil rights movement.

At the time of her action, Parks was secretary of the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP and had recently attended the Highlander Folk School, a Tennessee center for workers' rights and racial equality. Although widely honored in later years for her action, she suffered for it, losing her job as a seamstress in a local department store. Eventually, she moved to Detroit, where she found similar work. From 1965 to 1988 she served as secretary and receptionist to African-American U.S. Rep. John Conyers. After retirement from this position, she wrote an autobiography and lived a largely private life in Detroit.

Parks eventually received many honors ranging from the 1979 Spingarn Medal to the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Gold Medal and a posthumous statue in the United States Capitol's National Statuary Hall. When she died in 2005, she was granted the posthumous honor of lying in honor at the Capitol Rotunda.

Betty Friedan (born 1921)
Friedan was an American writer, activist, and feminist.

A leading figure in the "second wave" of the U.S. women's movement, her 1963 book "The Feminine Mystique" is sometimes credited with sparking the "second wave" of feminism. Friedan co-founded National Organization for Women in 1966, which aimed to bring women "into the mainstream of American society now [in] fully equal partnership with men".

In 1970, after stepping down as NOW's first president in 1969, Friedan organized the nation-wide Women's Strike for Equality on Aug. 26, the 50th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. The national strike was successful beyond expectations in broadening the feminist movement. The New York City march alone attracted over 50,000 women.

Friedan joined other leading feminists (including Gloria Steinem, Shirley Chisholm, Fannie Lou Hamer, Bella Abzug, and Myrlie Evers-Williams) in founding the National Women's Political Caucus in 1971. In 1977 she joined some of the movement's most visible and influential leaders, and 20,000 other women, at the International Women's Year federally-funded convention, the National Women's Conference, a legislative conference that sent a report to President Jimmy Carter, Congress, and all the states on how to achieve equality.

Friedan was a strong proponent of the repeal of abortion laws, founding the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws, which after abortion was legalized in 1973, became the National Abortion Rights Action League. She was also a strong supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution and of abortion rights.

Friedan died on Feb. 4, 2006, her 85th birthday.

Isabel Martínez de Perón (born 1931)
María Estela Martínez Cartas de Perón, better known as Isabel Martínez de Perón or Isabel Perón, is a former President of Argentina. She was also the third wife of another former president, Juan Perón. During her husband's third term as president, Perón served as vice president and following her husband's death in office, Perón served as president from July 1, 1974 to March 24, 1976. She was the first non-royal female head of state and head of government in the Western Hemisphere.

In 2007, an Argentine judge ordered the arrest of Isabel Perón over the forced disappearance of an activist in February 1976, on the grounds that the disappearance was authorized by her signing of decrees allowing Argentina's armed forces to take action against "subversives". She was arrested near her home in Spain on 12 January 2007. Spanish courts subsequently rejected her extradition to Argentina.

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